Are you in the Loop with the federal regulation of hazardous waste management and hazardous recyclable materials in Canada? The C.L.E.A.N. Alliance is! C.L.E.A.N. has been providing sound, compliant, and affordable hazardous waste management solutions for our customers.

The federal regulations for the Management of Hazardous wastes in Canada must be understood by managers and owners of businesses that generate and dispose hazardous waste. For example, if you are producing toxic materials such as PCB’s, it is important to understand the strict regulations and options for their management.

C.L.E.A.N. can provide all of the professional hazardous waste management solutions to process your hazardous wastes. Below we have provided you with the opportunity to read the information and the regulations as they apply in Canada.

 

The information on the hazardous waste management regulations provided in this document is available on the Environment Canada website.

C.L.E.A.N. has successfully provided hazardous waste management solutions to satisfied customers all across Canada and is involved on a daily basis implementing hazardous waste management programs for our customers with all of the three categories below.

1. The Export and Import of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material Regulations (EIHWHRMR)

2. The PCB Waste Export Regulations, 1966

3. Interprovincial Movement of Hazardous Waste Regulations

Below are several examples of the regulatory compliance of Hazardous Waste in Canada as they are set out in Environment Canada’s site.

In Canada, all three levels of government contribute to environmental protection and have a role in hazardous waste management and hazardous recyclable materials.

• Municipal governments are responsible for establishing collection, recycling, and disposal programs within their jurisdictions.

• Provincial and territorial governments establish measures and criteria for licensing hazardous-waste generators, carriers, and treatment facilities, in addition to controlling movements of wastes within their jurisdictions.

• The Federal Government regulates transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials, in addition to negotiating international agreements.

Environment Canada implements the terms of international agreements related to hazardous waste management and hazardous recyclable materials to which it is a party. In signing these agreements, Canada made a commitment to develop national legislation to promote the environmentally sound management of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials.

The Export and Import of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material Regulations (EIHWHRMR)

1. The Export and Import of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material Regulations (EIHWHRMR) were amended on May 4, 2012. The amendments were published in on May 23, 2012.

If you are an individual or business that exports from, imports into, or transits withinhazardous waste management transport Canada (for recycling or disposal purposes), wastes or materials that are considered to be hazardous under the EIHWHRMR, Environment Canada has prepared a guide to help you fulfill your responsibilities according to the Regulations.

C.L.E.A.N. provides this needs analysis for your company and will give you a report to review your options when you are faced with generating hazardous waste that you want to export, import or transport to other provinces in Canada.

 

 

The PCB Waste Export Regulations, 1966

Polychlorinated biphenyl

2. The PCB Waste Export Regulations, 1966 allow Canadian owners of PCB waste to export such wastes to the United States for treatment and destruction (excluding landfilling) when these wastes are in concentrations equal to or greater than 50 parts per million. The Regulations require that advance notice of proposed export shipments be hazardous waste management given to Environment Canada. If the PCB waste shipment complies with the Regulations for the protection of human health and the environment, and authorities in any countries or provinces through which the waste will transit do not object to the shipment, a permit is sent from Environment Canada to the applicant authorizing the shipment to proceed.

C.L.E.A.N. provides hazardous waste management solutions for the transportation and disposal of PCB’s. If your organization generates PCB’s, C.L.E.A.N. will provide you with options that your organization can choose from, for the transportation and disposal of PCB’s.

Current Regulation

PCB Waste Export Regulations, 1996 (SOR/97-109)

The PCB Waste Export Regulations, 1966 were published in Canada Gazette Part II on February 7, 1997. The Regulations apply to PCB liquids, PCB solids, PCB mixtures, PCB equipment, PCB-contaminated solid or electrical equipment, and packaging that held any of these materials. PCB liquids, solids and mixtures will be controlled down to a concentration of 50 parts per million. The Regulations establish strict controls on the export of PCB waste, that are an enhancement of similar controls already in place for hazardous waste under the Export and Import of Hazardous Wastes Regulations. Export is only allowed for thermal or chemical destruction at authorized and environmentally sound U.S. facilities. Export for landfilling and purposes other than those listed in the Regulations is not allowed. Exports of PCB wastes to countries other than the United States continue to be prohibited. The key elements of the Regulations are: prior notification for proposed exports; consent from U.S. authorities (written or 45-day tacit consent); exports only to facilities authorized to thermally or chemically destroy PCB wastes; transport by authorized carriers; contracts between Canadian exporters and U.S. importers; liability insurance of $5 million in case of release of PCB wastes into the environment during export; tracking of shipments via waste manifests and certification of disposal; and making alternative arrangement where the PCB waste cannot be received or disposed of as intended.

Interprovincial Movement of Hazardous Waste Regulations

3. Interprovincial Movement of Hazardous Waste Regulations

The Interprovincial Movement of Hazardous Waste Regulations, control the movements of hazardous waste between provinces and territories by prescribing the use of a tracking system.

C.L.E.A.N. has strategic alliances with several providers across Canada in order to provide our customers with the transportation and disposal of hazardous materials within the provinces and territories in Canada.

Current Regulation

Interprovincial Movement of Hazardous Waste Regulations (SOR/2002-301)

The goal of the Interprovincial Movement of Hazardous Waste Regulations (hereinafter referred to as the Interprovincial Regulations) is to ensure that the Canadian manifest tracking and hazards classification conditions for waste, formerly set out in the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations, are maintained for the interprovincial movements of hazardous wastes.

Under section 191 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Governor in Council has the authority to make regulations respecting conditions governing the movement within Canada of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials. The Interprovincial Regulations were required as a consequence of the new Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations (TDG Regulations), made pursuant to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992. These new TDG Regulations, which came into force on August 15, 2002, no longer included provisions for manifest tracking of hazardous waste.

At C.L.E.A.N. we are specialists at providing sound, compliant, and affordable waste management solutions anywhere in North America and several international locations.

If your organization needs to discuss the Waste Management of Hazardous or recyclable Hazardous waste materials, please contact our offices at 1 866 291 0056 or 905 880 3244 or info@cleanalliance.com

One Response to Hazardous waste management: Federal regulations
  1. The information was very detailed and helpful


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